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  • 144.00 lei

    The German classical philologist Friedrich August Wolf (1759–1824) developed a holistic approach which deeply influenced modern classical studies. In this 1795 treatise, he argues that the poems attributed to Homer were composed orally and that, prior to their transcription, they were altered by editors and performers in order to appeal to contemporary audiences, only coming together in their apparent artistic unity once they had been written down. Like many scholars of his day, seeking to reach an international audience, Wolf wrote in Latin here. And although he may have intended to address further questions relating to the Homeric epics, only this volume was ever published. Radical at the time, the arguments presented here now form the foundation of modern Homeric scholarship, shedding light on the composition, performance, transmission and evolution of ancient poetry.

  • 187.00 lei

    A prolific philologist of both the German and classical languages, Moriz Haupt (1808–74) enjoyed a successful academic career at the universities of Leipzig and Berlin. As well as founding the Zeitschrift für deutsches Altertum, which is still published, he was a painstaking yet somewhat bold editor of many classical texts. In the years immediately following his death, his shorter works were gathered together in this three-volume collection, edited by fellow philologist Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff (1848–1931). Volume 1 (1875) contains essays by Haupt in both Latin and German on a variety of classical subjects. Included here are his Quaestiones Catullianae (1837), an analysis of a fragment of a Pindaric dithyramb, and a commentary on the bucolic poems of Calpurnius and Nemesianus. This work remains of value to researchers interested in the history of classical scholarship, particularly the significant contributions made by German scholars in the nineteenth century.

  • 201.00 lei

    The philologist Georg Friedrich Grotefend (1775–1853) combined his career as a senior master at schools in Frankfurt and Hannover with the publication of school textbooks on German and Latin, and academic research in ancient history and languages. He was a co-founder of the Monumenta Germaniae Historica series of historical sources, still widely consulted today, and is also remembered for his role in deciphering Old Persian cuneiform. During his lifetime he was best known for his study of the geography and history of pre-Roman Italy (published 1840–2 and also reissued in the Cambridge Library Collection) and his analyses of the fragmentary evidence for the Umbrian and Oscan languages, published in Latin in 1835–9 and now reissued in this volume. Inscriptions from buildings, tablets, coins and vessels allow Grotefend to reconstruct significant portions of the grammars of these early languages belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European family.

  • 223.00 lei

    A prolific philologist of both the German and classical languages, Moriz Haupt (1808–74) enjoyed a successful academic career at the universities of Leipzig and Berlin. As well as founding the Zeitschrift für deutsches Altertum, which is still published, he was a painstaking yet somewhat bold editor of many classical texts. In the years immediately following his death, his shorter works were gathered together in this three-volume collection, edited by fellow philologist Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff (1848–1931). Volume 2 (1876) contains the Latin text of forty-two lectures delivered by Haupt twice a year at the University of Berlin between 1854 and 1874. The lectures cover a variety of topics concerning classical texts, philology and literature, including an exposition of the forgeries by Simeon Bosius of the texts of Catullus. This work remains of value to researchers interested in nineteenth-century German classical scholarship.

  • 266.00 lei

    A prolific philologist of both the German and classical languages, Moriz Haupt (1808–74) enjoyed a successful academic career at the universities of Leipzig and Berlin. As well as founding the Zeitschrift für deutsches Altertum, which is still published, he was a painstaking yet somewhat bold editor of many classical texts. In the years immediately following his death, his shorter works were gathered together in this three-volume collection, edited by fellow philologist Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff (1848–1931). Volume 3 (1876) originally appeared in two parts, which are reissued here together. Among the articles in German and Latin are a discussion of a fragment of the eulogy for the Ostrogoth king Theodahad and a talk given at the celebration of the Kaiser's birthday in 1871. This work remains of value to researchers interested in nineteenth-century philology, particularly the significant contributions made by its German practitioners.

  • 345.00 lei

    An Austrian Dominican priest, Heinrich Denifle (1844–1905) carried out painstaking research in the archives of the Vatican and in libraries throughout Europe, resulting in several major publications on medieval history and theology. In 1887 he was appointed to edit the medieval records of the University of Paris, with the assistance of the palaeographer Emile Chatelaine (1851–1933). Paris was the centre of theological learning in Europe in the Middle Ages, and the records here contain important information regarding the university's organisation, teachers, students, relations with popes and kings, religious orders, and intellectual controversies. The four volumes published between 1889 and 1897 contain the texts of some 2,700 records, with references to many more in the notes. The university came into being around 1160, and Volume 1 (1889) covers the period up to 1286, with some 55 documents dating from before 1200.

  • 360.00 lei

    An Austrian Dominican priest, Heinrich Denifle (1844–1905) carried out painstaking research in the archives of the Vatican and in libraries throughout Europe, resulting in several major publications on medieval history and theology. In 1887 he was appointed to edit the medieval records of the University of Paris, with the assistance of the palaeographer Emile Chatelaine (1851–1933). Paris was the centre of theological learning in Europe in the Middle Ages, and the records here contain important information regarding the university's organisation, teachers, students, relations with popes and kings, religious orders, and intellectual controversies. The four volumes published between 1889 and 1897 contain the texts of some 2,700 records, with references to many more in the notes. Volume 2 (1891) contains material covering 1286–1350, when the university was growing both in size and influence internationally.

  • 360.00 lei

    An Austrian Dominican priest, Heinrich Denifle (1844–1905) carried out painstaking research in the archives of the Vatican and in libraries throughout Europe, resulting in several major publications on medieval history and theology. In 1887 he was appointed to edit the medieval records of the University of Paris, with the assistance of the palaeographer Emile Chatelaine (1851–1933). Paris was the centre of theological learning in Europe in the Middle Ages, and the records here contain important information regarding the university's organisation, teachers, students, relations with popes and kings, religious orders, and intellectual controversies. The four volumes published between 1889 and 1897 contain the texts of some 2,700 records, with references to many more in the notes. Volume 3 (1894) covers 1350–94, as the university dealt with the aftermath of the Black Death, and with the Hundred Years War.

  • 374.00 lei

    An Austrian Dominican priest, Heinrich Denifle (1844–1905) carried out painstaking research in the archives of the Vatican and in libraries throughout Europe, resulting in several major publications on medieval history and theology. In 1887 he was appointed to edit the medieval records of the University of Paris, with the assistance of the palaeographer Emile Chatelaine (1851–1933). Paris was the centre of theological learning in Europe in the Middle Ages, and the records here contain important information regarding the university's organisation, teachers, students, relations with popes and kings, religious orders, and intellectual controversies. The four volumes published between 1889 and 1897 contain the texts of some 2,700 records, with references to many more in the notes. Volume 4 (1897) contains almost a thousand records from the period 1394–1452, a difficult time for the university owing to the Western Schism and the Hundred Years War.

  • 403.00 lei

    The Greek geographer and historian Strabo is known chiefly for this remarkable description of the known world in the early decades of the Roman Empire. The range and importance of the text ensured its copying and distribution in the medieval period, and multiple printed editions appeared later. Reissued here is the version published by the influential French publishing house Didot in 1853 as part of their series of Greek classics. It was prepared by the German classical scholars Karl Wilhelm Ludwig Müller (1813–94) and Johann Friedrich Dübner (1802–67). Müller's two-volume collection of the writings of lesser-known Greek geographers, Geographi Graeci Minores (1855–61), is also reissued in this series. The full text of Strabo's seventeen books is presented here in Greek with a parallel Latin translation as well as variant readings. Also included are several maps and a substantial index of names and places.

  • 647.00 lei

    A prolific philologist of both the German and classical languages, Moriz Haupt (1808–74) enjoyed a successful academic career at the universities of Leipzig and Berlin. As well as founding the Zeitschrift für deutsches Altertum, which is still published, he was a painstaking yet somewhat bold editor of many classical texts. In the years immediately following his death, his shorter works were gathered together in this three-volume collection, edited by fellow philologist Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff (1848–1931). Volume 1 (1875) contains essays in both Latin and German, including Haupt's Quaestiones Catullianae (1837). Volume 2 (1876) contains the Latin text of forty-two lectures delivered by Haupt twice a year at the University of Berlin between 1854 and 1874. Volume 3 (1876) originally appeared in two parts, which are reissued here together. This collection will be of value to researchers interested in the history of classical scholarship, particularly its German practitioners.

  • 1367.00 lei

    An Austrian Dominican priest, Heinrich Denifle (1844–1905) carried out painstaking research in the archives of the Vatican and in libraries throughout Europe, resulting in several major publications on medieval history and theology. In 1887 he was appointed to edit the medieval records of the University of Paris, with the assistance of the palaeographer Emile Chatelaine (1851–1933). Paris was the centre of theological learning in Europe in the Middle Ages, and the records here contain important information regarding the university's organisation, teachers, students, relations with popes and kings, religious orders, and intellectual controversies. The four volumes published between 1889 and 1897 contain the texts of some 2,700 records, with references to many more in the notes.

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